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Swedish lapphund

Swedish lapphund.
Swedish lapphund.

 

Genetically, the breed falls into a haplogroup sub-clade called d1 by researchers, and it is only found in Scandinavia. It is the result of a female wolf-male dog hybridization that has occurred post-domestication.[1][2] The northern Scandinavian subclade d2 originated 480-3,000 years before present and is found in all Sami-related breeds: Finnish Lapphund, Swedish Lapphund, Lapponian Herder, Jamthund and Norwegian Elkhound. The maternal wolf sequence that contributed to them has not been matched across Eurasia[3] and its branch is phylogenetically rooted in the same sequence as the 33,000 year-old Altai dog (not a direct ancestor).[4]

The Swedish lapphund has its origins among the ancient hunting tribes of northern Scandinavia, from the land that the Sámi people call Sapmi. In Sámi mythology it is said that the lapphund sought the post of worker amongst the Sámi people in exchange that it would always be well-treated. The lapphund has been used mainly for hunting and guarding. When the Sámi people started to keep domestic reindeer in the mid-18th century, the lapphund’s repertoire was expanded to include herding.

Hard work in the barren landscape of northern Scandinavia has created a very resilient breed. The shifting climate demands a weatherproof coat that is easy to maintain. The rough terrain and the varied work demand a dog with endurance, agility, intelligence and independence. The resulting Swedish lapphund is a well-rounded working dog, well suited both for work as a farm, hunting, and herding dog, and as a pet. (Wikipedia)

A list of all the dog breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club:

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

V

W

X

Y

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