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Russian tsvetnaya bolonka

Russian tsvetnaya bolonka.
Russian tsvetnaya bolonka.

Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka (Russian: Болонка), also known as the Bolonka Zwetna in Germany, is a rare toy breed of the Bichon type, developed in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, Russia from the ancestors of smaller dogs such as the Bichon, Toy Poodle, Shih Tzu, Pekingese and French Bolognese. They include the white version Franzuskaya Bolonka, which is a variation of the Italian Bolognese dog. Franzuskaya means French, Zwetna is the German term for Tsvetnaya and means multicolored, and Bolonka translates as “Bolognese” in a number of Slavic languages. The Bolonka has recently gained more fame by being the chosen breed of Prince William and Kate Middleton.[1]

History

The Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka had its beginnings as far back as the early 18th century. Louis IV of France presented the Bolonka as gifts to Russian nobility. Later, the ancestors of the Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka migrated to Russia with Napoleon’s army and they were known as the French Bolonka. Russia was never known for its toy breeds, partly because of its environment and its economic need for working dogs. Smaller breeds were considered superfluous and unnecessary, even more so during the Soviet Regime. During this time, dogs were not imported to Russia, so breeds were developed by selections from existing breeds. Being unable to import dogs from outside of Russia, the Bolonka was developed by localized breeding through dog lovers in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, who looked to the ancestors of smaller dogs such as the Bichon, Toy Poodle, Shih Tzu, Pekingese and French Bolognese, with a view to creating a toy sized lap dog that would have the right temperament for apartment living. Since 1966, they have been called Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka. Interest in the specific breed of Bolonka revived after the fall of the Iron Curtain. Similarly, through the connection between the Russian and French aristocracy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a dog similar to the Bichon Frisé or Bolognese of today was brought to Tsarist Russia. These little white dogs were favorites of the fashionable ladies of the period in both countries. After the Russian Revolution, the breed was isolated from the French dogs. The little dogs began to be taken seriously as a native Russian breed in the 1950s, and grew in popularity. Export of the dogs was strictly regulated. In 1978 a breeding pair of Franzuskaya Bolonka was sent as a diplomatic gift from the Soviet Union into the GDR. From these and a few others, the white Franzuskaya Bolonka began to be developed as a breed in Germany in the 1980s. Eventually it was recognized by the VDF (Verband für das Deutsche Hundewesen) as a variation of the Italian Bolognese. This was at the same time as the coloured version was being developed, the Bolonka Zwetnaya (bunte Schoßhündchen, Tsvetnaya Bolonka, Deutscher Bolonka). These are not yet recognized, although they have active breed clubs in several countries.[5] (Wikipedia)

A list of all the dog breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club:

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

V

W

X

Y

-4L

#dogs #dogbreeds #dog #canine #canines #breeds #russiantsvetnayabolonka #russian #tsvetnaya #bolonka

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