Ad

Pronghorn Antelope facts (Antilocapra americana)

f-pronghorn-antelope-facts-4leggers-com

Pronghorn antelope
Antilocapra americana

 

f-pronghorn-antelope-tracks-4leggers-comThe North American pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the surviving member of a group of animals that evolved in North America during the past 20 million years. It is not a true antelope, which is found in Africa and southeast Asia. The use of the term “antelope” seems to have originated when the first written description of the animal was made during the 1804–1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition. Prior to European American settlement of the West, pronghorn population estimated to be 35 million. Early in the 1800s, pronghorn were abundant in river valleys radiating from Yellowstone; settlement and hunting reduced their range and numbers. Park management also culled pronghorn during the first half of the 1900s due to overgrazing concerns.

DESCRIPTION:
Can run for sustained sprints of 45–50 mph. Young (fawns) born in late May–June.

According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).
According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).

APPEARANCE:
Both sexes have horns; males are pronged.

LENGTH:
45–55 inches (1.1-1.4 m)

HEIGHT:
35–40 inches at shoulder (0.9-1.0 m)

WEIGHT:
Male (buck) weighs 100–125 pounds (45-57). Female (doe) weighs 90–110 pounds (41-50).

LIFE SPAN:
7-10 years

THREAT LEVEL:
Least concern

HABITAT:
Grasslands. In national parks some small populations of pronghorn antelope are a concern for park officials because random catastrophic weather events such as severe winters and disease outbreaks can wipe out an all individuals in a geographic range.

f-pronghorn-antelope-scat-4leggers-comDIET:
Eat sagebrush and other shrubs, forbs, some grasses.

SIGNS OF PRESENCE:
Scat and tracks.

 

 

 

 

-4L-

#Pronghorn #Antelope #tracks #tracking #wildlife #PronghornAntelope

FacebooktwitterpinterestyoutubetumblrFacebooktwitterpinterestyoutubetumblr
Ad