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Mule Deer facts (Odocoileus hemionus)

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Mule deer
Odocoileus hemionus

 

The mule deer, also called blacktail deer, is an exclusively western species commonly seen in open-brush country throughout the western states. Often confused with the white-tailed deer, the mule deer is differentiated by their antler shape and tail size f-mule-deer-tracks-4leggers-comand appearance. Predators include wolves, coyotes, cougars, and bears.

DESCRIPTION:
Males grow antlers from April or May until August or September; shed them in late winter and spring. Mating season (rut) in November and December; fawns born late May to early August. Bounding gait, when four feet leave the ground, enables it to move more quickly through shrubs and rock fields.

APPEARANCE:
Summer coat: reddish; winter coat: gray-brown;white rump patch with black-tipped tail; brown patch on forehead; large ears.

According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).
According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).

LENGTH:
4.5-7 feet (1.4-2.1 m)

HEIGHT:
3.5 feet at the shoulder (1 m).

WEIGHT:
Male (buck): 150–250 pounds (68-113 kg). Female (doe): 100–175 pounds (45-79 kg).

LIFE SPAN:
9-11 years in the wild, but up to 25 years in captivity

THREAT LEVEL:
Least concern

HABITAT:
Lives in brushy areas, coniferous forests, grasslands.

f-mule-deer-scat-4leggers-comDIET:
Eats shrubs, forbs, grasses; conifers in spring.

SIGNS OF PRESENCE:
Mule deer scat and tracks are the best signs of their presence.

 

 

 

 

 

-4L-

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