Montane Vole facts (Microtus montanus)

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Montane Vole
Microtus montanus


f-voles-tracks-4leggers-comThis species is active year-round maintaining tunnels in the winter; also dig shallow burrows. Probably the most important prey species in Yellowstone National Park; eaten by coyotes, raptors, grizzly bears, other animals.

DESCRIPTION:
Typically breed from mid-February to November; up to four litters of 2–10 young per year.

APPEARANCE:
Brownish to grayish-brown, occasionally grizzled; ventral side is silvery gray; relatively short tail is bi-colored.

According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).
According to the IUCN this species is considered LEAST CONCERN (lowest threat level).

LENGTH:
5-8 inches (0.1-0.2 m)

WEIGHT:
1-3 ounces

LIFE SPAN:
2-16 months

THREAT LEVEL:
Least concern

HABITAT:
Found at all elevations in moist mountain meadows with abundant grass and grassy sagebrush communities; also common in riparian areas.

f-voles-scat-4leggers-comDIET:
Grass is their primary food.

SIGNS OF PRESENCE:
Browsing and bark-stripping are two ways to determine if there is a vole infestation about to happen. Feeding on various grasses, it is common for gardeners to discover browsing bites and nibbles on plants where the individual was testing to see if the plant is edible. Similar testing bites on trees where the bark has been ripped or stripped from a tree or other fauna, known as bark-stripping, will reveal young voles testing out new food sources.

-4L-

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